ORIGINAL PAPER
Respiratory health problems in adolescents living near main roads in the Upper Silesian industrial zone, Poland
 
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1
Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland (School of Public Health in Bytom, Department of Biostatistics)
2
Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland (Medical Faculty in Katowice, Department of Epidemiology)
3
Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Poland (School of Public Health in Bytom, Department of Epidemiology)
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Michał Skrzypek   

Medical University of Silesia, School of Public Health in Bytom, Department of Biostatistics, Piekarska 18, 41-902 Bytom, Poland
 
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2019;32(4):553–567
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: This study explores the association between self-reported exposure to traffic-related air pollution and respiratory health symptoms, as well as lung functions and skin prick tests in adolescents living in the vicinity of main roads. Material and Methods: The data in the study were acquired using a cross-sectional study conducted between 2004–2005 in Chorzów (Silesia, Poland) among adolescents (N = 936) aged 13–15 years, attending junior high schools. Adverse respiratory health symptoms and exposure to traffic-related air pollution were determined on the basis of a questionnaire. Moreover, all children underwent spirometry and skin prick tests. Multivariable logistic regression with multiple imputation for missing data was used to assess the prevalence of adverse respiratory symptoms in relation to self-reported exposure to traffic-related air pollution, adjusted for socioeconomic and environmental factors. Results: Among respiratory tract diseases, asthma and allergic rhinitis associations were statistically significant (OR = 2.16, 95% CI: 1.12–4.15 and OR = 1.69, 95% CI: 1.08–2.64, respectively). Likewise, among respiratory disorders, statistically significant associations were found in the case of wheezes and dyspnea attack (OR = 1.58, 95% CI: 1.10–2.26 and OR = 2.39, 95% CI: 1.56–3.66, respectively), with respect to the vicinity of the main road. Living in the area with high traffic intensity was statistically significantly associated with a higher prevalence of asthma and wheezes (OR = 2.31, 95% CI: 1.22–4.39 and 1.48, 95% CI: 1.09–2.01, respectively). The results obtained did not confirm the relationship between the adopted way of exposure to traffic-related air pollution and lung function indices or skin prick tests. Conclusions: Results of the study suggest that children living in the area with intense traffic are more likely to develop respiratory disorders. Moreover, the vicinity of a main road as well as traffic intensity could be suitable in assessing the relationship between road transport and potential health problems among exposed inhabitants. Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2019;32(4):553–67
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087