ORIGINAL PAPER
Self-employment in joinery: An occupational risk facor?
 
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1
Department of Occupational Diseases, University Hospital of Reims, Reims, France
2
Department of Occupational Diseases, University Hospital of Reims, 48 rue de Sébastopol, 51100, Reims, France
 
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2014;27(3):355–363
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: Only a few studies have analyzed the health of self-employed workers. This cross-sectional study is the first to compare health status among craftsmen joiners and paid joiners. Material and Methods: Clinical and paraclinical data for self-employed craftsmen and employees were collected by occupational health doctors according to a standardized protocol and compared. Health data and professional status relationships were analyzed by logistic regression. Results: A total of 171 craftsmen and 196 paid workers were included. Craftsmen had more dermatologic pathologies (odds ratio (OR) = 2.67, p < 0.05), ear/nose/throat symptoms (OR = 3.38, p < 0.001), pulmonary symptoms (OR = 2.46, p < 0.05), musculoskeletal symptoms (OR = 3.09, p < 0.001), and abnormal audiogram (OR = 3.50, p < 0.001). The FEV1 was significantly lower among craftsmen (p < 0.01), independently of tobacco smoke exposure. Conclusions: This survey highlights a high morbidity rate among self-employed craftsmen, suggesting that among woodworkers, professional status can be a risk factor for health. The preventive medical system for craftsmen has to be rethought to guarantee better safety for this population.
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087