ORIGINAL PAPER
Towards estimating the burden of disease attributable to second-hand smoke exposure in Polish children
 
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1
European Environment Agency, Copenhagen, Denmark
2
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland
3
Department of Environmental Epidemiology, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, św. Teresy 8, 91-348, Łódź, Poland
4
Department-Centre of Monitoring and Analysis of Population Health, National Institute of Public Health, National Institute of Hygiene, Warszawa, Poland
 
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2014;27(1):38–49
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ABSTRACT:
Objectives: To estimate the burden of disease attributable to second-hand smoke (SHS) exposure in Polish children in terms of the number of deaths and disability adjusted life years (DALYs) due to lower respiratory infections (LRI), otitis media (OM), asthma, low birth weight (LBW) and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Materials and Methods: Estimates of SHS exposure in children and in pregnant women as well as information concerning maternal smoking were derived from a national survey, the Global Youth Tobacco Survey, and the Global Adult Tobacco Survey in Poland. Mortality data (LRI, OM, asthma, and SIDS), the number of cases (LBW), and population data were obtained from national statistics (year 2010), and DALYs came from the WHO (year 2004). The burden of disease due to SHS was calculated by multiplying the total burden of a specific health outcome (deaths or DALYs) by a population attributable fraction. Results: Using two estimates of SHS exposure in children: 48% and 60%, at least 12 and 14 deaths from LRI in children aged up to 2 years were attributed to SHS, for the two exposure scenarios, respectively. The highest burden of DALYs was for asthma in children aged up to 15 years: 2412, and 2970 DALYs, for the two exposure scenarios, respectively. For LRI, 419 and 500 DALYs, and for OM, 61 and 77 DALYs were attributed to SHS, for the two exposure scenarios, respectively. Between 13% and 27% of SIDS cases and between 3% and 16% of the cases of LBW at term were attributed to SHS exposure. Conclusions: This study provides a conservative estimate of the public health impact of SHS exposure on Polish children. Lack of comprehensive, up to date health data concerning children, as well as lack of measures that would best reflect actual SHS exposure are major limitations of the study, likely to underestimate the burden of disease.
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087