ORIGINAL PAPER
An assessment of unstimulated salivary flow rate, IgA and clinical oral dryness among active and passive smokers
 
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Altamash Institute of Dental Medicine, Karachi, Pakistan (Department of Oral Pathology)
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Altamash Institute of Dental Medicine, Karachi, Pakistan (Department of Pathology)
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Bahria University Medical and Dental College, Karachi, Pakistan (Department of Oral Pathology)
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Altamash Institute of Dental Medicine, Karachi, Pakistan (Department of Prosthodontics)
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King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (Department of Periodontics and Community Dentistry, College of Dentistry)
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King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (Department of Restorative Dental Science, College of Dentistry)
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Princess Nourah bint Abdulrahman University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (Preventive Dental Sciences Department, Community Dentistry Division, College of Dentistry)
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King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia (Department of Prosthetic Dental Science, College of Dentistry)
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Tariq Abduljabbar   

King Saud University, Department of Prosthetic Dental Science, College of Dentistry, Riyadh 11545, Saudi Arabia
Online publication date: 2021-09-17
 
 
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: The aim of this study was to assess the impact of smoking on the whole salivary flow rate (SFR), IgA levels and clinical oral dryness (COD) among active and passive smokers. Material and Methods: The participants were categorized as active smokers (N = 54) or passive smokers (N = 163). Saliva was collected in tubes and placed in ice storage at –70°C. Salivary IgA levels were assessed in duplication using the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Following the saliva sample collection, the subjects were assessed for COD using the COD score, SFR and caries. Chi-square test, the t-test and ANOVA were employed to compare the clinical impact of the smoking status associated with specific variables (smoking status, number of cigarettes, active caries, gender, age, COD score, IgA level and SFR). A p-value of <0.05 was considered significant. Results: Two hundred and seventeen subjects with the mean age of 32.86±6.30 years, with 145 males (66.8%) and 72 females (33.2%), were included in the study. Among the active smokers, 88.8% were males compared to 11.2% females. The active smokers had the mean age of 32.52 years, a COD score of 1.43, an IgA level of 1.39 g/l, and a SFR of 0.37 ml/min. Among the passive smokers, 59.5% were males and 40.5% were females, with the mean age of 32.97 years, a COD score of 0.87 g/l, an IgA level of 1.47, and a SFR of 0.42 ml/min. Active caries showed a positive correlation with the number of cigarettes, with significance in the >35 years age group (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The study demonstrated significant differences in SFR, IgA and COD scores among the active and passive smokers. The number of cigarettes had a negative impact on saliva production, IgA levels, the oral health status, and the progression of caries with respect to age and gender. Smoking potentially leads to xerostomia associated with active caries.
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087