1.191
IF5
0.947
IF
15
MNiSW
146.95
ICV
ORIGINAL PAPER
 
CC BY-NC 3.0 Polska
 
 

Changes in blood morphology and chosen biochemical parameters in ultra-marathon runners during a 100-km run in relation to the age and speed of runners

Jakub Kortas 1,  
 
1
Gdansk University of Physical Education and Sport, Gdańsk, Poland (Department of Tourism and Recreation)
2
Medical University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland (Department of Medicine)
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):801–814
KEYWORDS:
TOPICS:
ABSTRACT:
Objectives: The objective of the study was to reveal morphology, electrolyte and chosen biochemical parameters in terms of health risk in runners in reference to their age and running speed in the case of running a distance of 100 km, which occur after 12 h or 24 h of recovery. Material and Methods: Fourteen experienced, male, amateur, ultra-marathon runners, divided into two age and two speed groups took part in the 100-km run. Blood samples for analyses indexes were collected from the ulnar vein just before the run, after 25 km, 50 km, 75 km and 100 km, as well as 12 h and 24 h after termination of the run. Results: The sustained ultramarathon run along with the distance covered (p < 0.05) caused an increase in myoglobin (max 90-fold), bilirubin (max 2.8-fold) and total antioxidant status (max 1.15-fold), which also continued during the recovery. Significant changes in the number of white blood cells were observed with each sequential course and could be associated with muscle damage. The electrolyte showed changes towards slight hyperkalemia, but no changes in natrium and calcium concentrations. There were no significant differences between the age and speed groups for all the parameters after completing the 100-km run as well as after 12 h and 24 h of recovery. Conclusions: Considering changes in blood morphology and chosen biochemical parameters in ultra-marathon runners during a 100-km run it can be stated that such an exhausting effort may be dangerous for human health due to metabolic changes and large damage to the organs. Negative metabolic changes are independent of age of an ultramarathon runner and occur both in younger (32±5.33 years) and older participants (50.56±9.7 years). It can be concluded that organ damage and negative metabolic changes during a 100-km run occur similarly in participants less experienced as well as in well trained runners. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):801–814
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Zbigniew Jastrzębski   
Gdansk University of Physical Education and Sport, Department of Tourism and Recreation, Górskiego 1, 80-336 Gdańsk, Poland
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087