ORIGINAL PAPER
Organizational climate and counterproductive work behaviors – the moderating role of gender
 
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University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland (Institute of Psychology)
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Agnieszka Lipińska-Grobelny   

University of Lodz, Institute of Psychology, Smugowa 10/12, 91-433 Łódź, Poland
Online publication date: 2021-02-19
 
 
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: The aim of the research was to check whether the organizational climate explains behaviors harmful to the organization. Theoretical justification for the research was provided by the Stressor-Emotion Model by Spector and Fox (2005), in which various stressors lead to the depletion of resources, which in effect favors engaging in unethical work behaviors. Material and Methods: The research was conducted with the participation of 230 people aged 19–67 (125 women and 105 men) with at least 1 year of seniority. The following set of techniques was used: the Organizational Climate Questionnaire by Kolb, the Counterproductive Work Behaviors-Checklist by Spector et al., and metrics. Results: The obtained results indicate that the higher the employees assess the climate in the company, the rarer counterproductive work behaviors (CWBs) appear in the form of abuse, sabotage, theft and withdrawal, both in the group of women and men. All the dimensions of the organizational climate, such as the level of responsibility, requirements, organization, evaluation of awards, management, and the sense of warmth and support, are important for this relationship. The moderating role of gender in the relationship between organizational climate and CWBs was achieved for sabotage and withdrawal, and the following environmental conditions: organizational climate, responsibility, requirements, and organization. Conclusions: These results may be applied in designing a supportive organizational climate to weaken CWBs such as abuse, sabotage, theft and withdrawal.
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087