ORIGINAL PAPER
The lagged effect of air pollution on human eosinophils: a distributed lag non-linear model
Zhaojun Ding 1,   Zhen Xie 2, 3,   Yang Su 3, 4,   Jiying Qi 1,   Bin Cui 1  
 
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1
Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China (Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin Hospital)
2
University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China (Department of Dermatology, Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital)
3
Chinese Academy of Sciences Sichuan Translational Medicine Research Hospital, Chengdu, China
4
University of Electronic Science and Technology of China, Chengdu, China (Clinical Laboratory, Sichuan Provincial People’s Hospital)
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Bin Cui   

Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai Clinical Center for Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Shanghai Institute of Endocrine and Metabolic Diseases, Ruijin Hospital, 197 Ruijin Er Lu, Shanghai 200025, China
Online publication date: 2020-04-01
 
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2020;33(3):299–310
 
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the lag between exposure to air pollutants and changes in human eosinophil counts. Material and Methods: This was a retrospective study employing 246 425 physical examination records dated December 2013 – December 2016 from Chengdu, China. The authors determined the prevalence of individuals with eosinophil counts above the normal reference range each day. A distributed lag non-linear model was used to evaluate the lagged effect of each air pollutant on eosinophil counts. The lagged effects of each air pollutant were counted and presented with smoothing splines. Results: The effects of air pollutants such as particulate matter (PM2.5, aerodynamic diameters <2.5 μm; PM10, aerodynamic diameters <10 μm), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) were evaluated. In women, the effects of PM2.5 (RR = 1.154, 95% CI: 1.061–1.255) and PM10 (RR = 1.309, 95% CI: 1.130–1.517) reached the maximum values on lag day 0. In men, there was no significant effect of PM2.5, but significant effects of PM10 were found for lag days 20–28. The effects of NO2 and O3 on eosinophils were not statistically significant for either gender. Conclusions: The air pollutants of PM10 have a significant effect on human eosinophils for both women and men, but with different temporal patterns, with women showing a lag of 0–5 days and men showing a lag of 20–28 days. In addition, PM2.5 was significant for women with a lag of 0–3 days but it was not significant for men. Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2020;33(3):299–310
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087