ORIGINAL PAPER
The prevalence and risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders in the hands of fishermen working as oyster shuckers
Jin Sung Park 1,   Jun-Il Yoo 2  
,   Jae-Bum Na 3,   Han Soo Song 4
 
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1
Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea (Institute of Health Sciences, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery)
2
Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea (Department of Orthopaedic Surgery)
3
Gyeongsang National University School of Medicine and Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Jinju, Republic of Korea (Institute of Health Sciences, Department of Radiology)
4
Chosun University Hospital, Gwang-ju, Republic of Korea (Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine)
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Jun-Il Yoo   

Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, 90 Chilamdong, Jinju, Gyeongnamdo 660-702, Republic of Korea
Online publication date: 2021-03-30
 
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2021;34(5):603–615
 
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders in the hands and wrists of fishermen working as oyster shuckers, and to identify the risk factors associated with oyster shucking. Material and Methods: A total of 590 fishery workers including those working as oyster shuckers in 2015–2017 were included in the study analysis. Hand osteoarthritis (OA), carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), and ulnar impaction syndrome were diagnosed using X-ray, magnetic resonance imaging, and physical examinations according to each diagnostic criterion. The Rapid Entire Body Assessment was used as a measurement tool for analyzing the occupation-related burden factors. Results: The prevalence of hand OA, CTS, and ulnar impaction syndrome was higher in oyster shuckers than in aquaculture/offshore fishery workers. The prevalence of upper limb disease was higher in oyster shuckers than in other fishery workers, even in the prevalence of exposure to occupational burden factors. In oyster shuckers, the incidence of hand and wrist OA was 84%, that of CTS was 72%, and that of ulnar impaction syndrome was 41%. In addition, oyster shuckers were more likely to be exposed to occupational burden factors than were other types of fishermen. Conclusions: The prevalence of hand OA, CTS, and ulnar impaction syndrome was higher in oyster shuckers. Therefore, proper stretching or exercises for rest and musculoskeletal relaxation, along with health-care education and promotion, will be needed for the fishermen’s repeated posture and impact work. Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2021;34(5):603–15
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087