ORIGINAL PAPER
Determinants of vitamin D status among Jordanian employees: Focus on the night shift effect
Eman Alefishat 1  
,  
 
 
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1
The University of Jordan, Amman, Jordan (Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Biopharmaceutics and Clinical Pharmacy)
2
Applied Science Private University, Amman, Jordan (Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Clinical Pharmacy and Therapeutics)
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Eman Alefishat   

The University of Jordan, Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Biopharmaceutics and Clinical Pharmacy, Queen Rania Street, Amman 11942, Jordan
 
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):859–870
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: To assess the association between night work and 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25OHD) levels, and to evaluate effect of potential risk factors on 25OHD levels. Material and Methods: A total of 140 adult Jordanian employees were recruited. Demographic, lifestyle and working patterns data were documented through a well-structured questionnaire. Vitamin D status was assessed by measuring circulating concentrations of 25OHD. Results: Mean 25OHD level was 23.8 ng/ml. No significant difference was found in 25OHD levels between the summer and winter (p = 0.46), or between males and females (p = 0.35). The female night workers had significantly lower serum 25OHD levels compared to the female day workers (p = 0.01). No significant difference in serum 25OHD levels was found between the night and day male workers (p = 0.25). The number of night shifts/month was negatively correlated with 25OHD levels in both the males and females (p = 0.01 and p = 0.007, respectively). Age was positively correlated with 25OHD levels in both the males and females (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001, respectively). Body mass index was negatively associated with 25OHD levels in the whole sample (p = 0.03), but not within each gender group (p = 0.21 for the males and p = 0.09 for the females). Smoking had no significant association with 25OHD levels (p = 0.99 for the males and p = 0.22 for the females). Conclusions: Our results suggest that women working night shifts are at higher risk of 25OHD deficiency, and, consequently, of other health problems linked to 25OHD deficiency. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(5):859–870
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087