ORIGINAL PAPER
General self-efficacy and the effect of hospital workplace violence on doctors’ stress and job satisfaction in China
Yongcheng Yao 1  
,  
Wei Wang 1
,  
Faxuan Wang 2
,  
Wu Yao 1, 3
 
 
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1
Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China
2
Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Ningxia Medical university, Yinchuan, Ningxia, China
3
Department of Occupational Health, School of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Kexue Road 100 of Zhengzhou, Zhengzhou, China
 
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2014;27(3):389–399
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: This study aims at exploring associations of general self-efficacy (GSE), workplace violence and doctors' work-related attitudes. Material and Methods: In this study a cross-sectional survey design was applied. Questionnaires were administrated to 758 doctors working in 9 hospitals of Zhengzhou, Henan province, China, between June and October 2010. General information on age, gender, and years of working was collected, and the doctors' experience and witnessing workplace violence, job satisfaction, job initiative, occupational stress as well as GSE were measured. General linear regression analysis was performed in association analyses. Results: Both experiencing and witnessing workplace violence were significantly positively correlated with the level of occupational stress but significantly negatively correlated with job satisfaction, job initiative, and GSE. General self-efficacy significantly modified relationships between both experiencing and witnessing workplace violence with occupational stress (β = 0.49 for experiencing violence; β = 0.43 for witnessing violence; p < 0.001) and with job satisfaction (β = -0.35 and -0.34, respectively; p < 0.05). However, it did not modify the relationships between both experiencing and witnessing workplace violence with job initiative (p > 0.05). The levels of occupational stress declined significantly with the increase of GSE, while job satisfaction increased significantly along with its increase. The effects of GSE on occupational stress and job satisfaction weakened as the frequency of violence increased. Conclusions: The findings suggest that GSE can modify effects of workplace violence on health care workers' stress and job satisfaction. Enhancing GSE in combination with stress reduction may lead to facilitating health care workers' recovery from workplace violence, and thereby improving their work-related attitudes.
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087