ORIGINAL PAPER
Perceived barriers and motivators to smoking cessation among socially-disadvantaged populations in Poland
 
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1
Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland (Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology)
2
Medical University of Gdansk, Gdańsk, Poland (Department of Public Health and Social Medicine)
3
Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Łódź, Poland (Department of Work Physiology and Ergonomics)
4
Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland (Department of Computer Science and Medical Statistics)
5
Medical University of Lodz, Łódź, Poland (Department of Nutrition in Digestive Tract Diseases)
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Dorota Kaleta   

Medical University of Lodz, Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, Żeligowskiego 7/9, 90-752 Łódź, Poland
 
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ABSTRACT
Objectives: This study aimed at assessment of the perceived barriers and motivators to smoking cessation among socially-disadvantaged populations in Poland. It is hypothesized that different factors can be considered depending on the level of smoking addiction. Therefore, a comparison between light and heavy smokers was performed. Material and Methods: Data collected during the second wave of a cross-sectional study carried out in the Piotrkowski District in October 2016 – February 2017 among 1668 socio-economically disadvantaged persons constituted the source of information for the present study. Barriers and motivators to smoking cessation among daily smokers were identified via face-to face interviews. Results: About one-third of the studied population admitted to being current daily smokers, almost 75% of whom were heavy smokers. The most common barriers to quitting smoking were related to difficulties in quitting (62%), the lack of willingness to quit (56%), as well as addiction and withdrawal symptoms (craving cigarettes [65%], habit [56%], stress and mood swings [55%]). A significantly higher proportion of such barriers was noted among heavy smokers compared to light smokers (p < 0.05). The following motivations to quit were pointed out by the respondents: available pharmacotherapy (47%), access to a free-of-charge cessation clinic (40%), and encouragement and support provided by their doctor (30%), with no differences between various levels of smoking addiction (p > 0.05). Conclusions: Developing effective interventions targeted at unique deprived populations requires understanding the barriers and motivators to quitting smoking. Social support and financial issues, including free-of-charge pharmacotherapy and cessation clinics, as well as doctor’s encouragement and support, are crucial for successful smoking cessation in this vulnerable population.
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087