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ORIGINAL PAPER
 
CC BY-NC 3.0 Polska
 
 

Relationship between occupational stress and cardiovascular diseases risk factors in drivers

Hamed Biglari 1,  
Maryam Salehi 3,  
Iman Ahmadnezhad 5, 6,  
 
1
Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, Iran (Social Development and Health Promotion Research Center, School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health Engineering)
2
Shahroud University of Medical Sciences, Shahroud, Iran (Occupational and Environmental Health Research Center)
3
University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran (Department of Health Psychology, Faculty of Psychology and Education Sciences)
4
University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Tehran, Iran (Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, Department of Ergonomics, School of Rehabilitation)
5
National Iranian Oil Company, Tehran, Iran (Iranian Petroleum Industry, Health Research Institute (IPI HRI))
6
Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran (School of Advanced Technologies in Medicine, Department of Addiction Study)
7
Kermanshah University of Medical Sciences, Kermanshah, Iran (Research Center for Environmental Determinants of Health (RCEDH))
8
Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran (School of Public Health, Department of Occupational Health Engineering)
Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(6):895–901
KEYWORDS:
TOPICS:
ABSTRACT:
Objectives: Of all work stressors, occupational stress is the leading cause of many disorders among workers. Drivers are classified as a high risk group for work related stress. This study set out to determine the relationship between risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and occupational stress among drivers. Material and Methods: Two hundred and twenty two Ilam’s intercity drivers were selected for the study. For measuring work stress, the Osipow work stress questionnaire was used. After a 10-h fasting period, systolic and diastolic blood pressure was recorded. Intravenous blood samples were taken to determine cholesterol, triglyceride and blood glucose levels. The independent samples t-test and Pearson’s correlation test were used to assess the relationship between variables and occupational stress. Results: Seventy-one percent of the intercity drivers suffered from average to acute stress, and 3.1% of them suffered from acute stress. There was no significant relationship between occupational stress and diastolic blood pressure (p = 0.254) among the drivers. Nevertheless, the Pearson’s correlation test demonstrated a strong relationship between work stress and blood glucose (p < 0.01), while no strong correlation was found for blood triglycerides and cholesterol levels. Conclusions: Based on the results, high rates of occupational stress were observed in the Ilam’s intercity drivers. Occupational stress may have effect on blood glucose levels but the results did not suggest a considerable relationship between risk factors of cardiovascular diseases and occupational stress among intercity drivers. Int J Occup Med Environ Health 2016;29(6):895–901
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR:
Mohsen Poursadeghiyan   
University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences, Pediatric Neurorehabilitation Research Center, Department of Ergonomics, School of Rehabilitation, Kodakyar Ave., Daneshjo Blvd., Evin, 1985713834 Tehran, Iran
eISSN:1896-494X
ISSN:1232-1087